Cuffed in the back of a van with no seatbelts. You can get a ticket for not wearing a seatbelt in your car.

  • @stanleytweedle@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    English
    2162 months ago

    The incident bears similarities to what is known as a “rough ride,” a term used to describe police placing a detained person in the back of a van, without a seatbelt, and then driving erratically. The term came to mass prominence after the controversial 2015 death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore, who suffered severe injuries as he was being transported in a police van.

    Wish we could stop tip-toeing around it. This was clear extrajudicial punishment but everyone from cop to judge will pretend it’s some kind of accident or misunderstanding and ignore the totally systemic source of the problem- that cops have zero accountability.

    • @snooggums@midwest.social
      link
      fedilink
      English
      1332 months ago

      Speaking of not tip toeing things:

      controversial 2015 death of Freddie Gray

      The murder of Freddie Gray. The cops knew that what they did was dangerous because they have to clean up car accidents. Choosing to give someone a ‘rough ride’ is premeditated murder or attempted murder and anyone other than a cop would be charged.

    • hannes3120
      link
      fedilink
      142 months ago

      This was clear extrajudicial punishment

      I think it’s great how Americans mistrust the police so they live vigilantes but apparently the police also wants to play vigilante even though they would be in the perfect position to ensure that vigilantism isn’t needed.

    • @helenslunch@feddit.nl
      link
      fedilink
      22 months ago

      “No, you’re going to take the ride today. I’ve decided that you’re going to actually go to jail today. Far too many problems with you,” she responded. “We’re getting all kinds of complaints. Can’t be doing this,” the officer said.

      “You get tickets all the time. You don’t care. You don’t change your ways,” she explained.

      In the body cam footage, Thacker remarked that any crime should be a felony after certain number of incidents. “A year in jail would probably settle it,” he added.

      Yeah I dunno how anyone can hear these words come out of this person’s mouth and think this is anything other than “extrajudicial punishment”.

      Talking about what “should” happen, rather than upholding the law.

  • @tacosplease@lemmy.world
    link
    fedilink
    1832 months ago

    A homeless guy slept in public too many times, and the police decided to arrest him.

    They handcuffed and chained him then drove fast and slammed the brakes on purpose with him in the back of the van. That broke his neck - paralyzing him from the neck down. Both legs needed to be amputated as well.

    For falling asleep in a grass lot…

    • Kalkaline
      link
      fedilink
      1032 months ago

      Call me crazy, but I would be happy to pay extra in taxes to make sure everyone had a roof over their head, healthcare (including dental, vision, mental health care), and their basic needs of life met (including hygiene products). If that comes out of police budgets, so be it.

          • @n3m37h@lemmy.dbzer0.com
            link
            fedilink
            42 months ago

            I live in Canada and I want more socialism but our politicians keep destroying the system because they have rich friends that need help getting richer (Doug Ford I’m looking at you)

          • @drivepiler@lemmy.world
            link
            fedilink
            142 months ago

            Genuine question; How is it a joke? That’s pretty much what we do where I’m from, and we’re generally considered socialists.

            • @Specal@lemmy.world
              link
              fedilink
              122 months ago

              If you take an industry, and make it owned and run by the workers, take the NHS of the UK for example. It’s paid for by taxes, therefore owned by the public, and is run by the public, that’s socialism. But just paying tax alone to have more services isn’t socialism. Socialism is defined by the ownership and regulation of business and service by the people.

              So paying taxes for the government to pay a private company to do the work is not socialism, for example madicaid in the US.

              It doesn’t seem like a big difference at first but the results are massively different.

                • @Specal@lemmy.world
                  link
                  fedilink
                  32 months ago

                  Just want to say when I said “confuses the dumbasses” I wasn’t referring to people like yourself, I was talking about hyper capitalists.

      • @AdmiralShat@programming.dev
        link
        fedilink
        English
        23
        edit-2
        2 months ago

        Yeah but then you’d get people trying to be homeless on purpose

        spoiler

        This is a joke, please don’t hurt me

        Edit: how the fuck does spoiler text work

      • @Jimmyeatsausage@lemmy.world
        link
        fedilink
        32 months ago

        It has, but exposing enough people to injustice like this as much as possible as loudly as possible is how to peacefully change entrenched systems.

        • No doubt, I’m all for the increased optics. But, police abuse of power has likely dropped a bit since everyone has a video camera in their pocket, but due to the nature of the statistics we’ll never know for sure one way or another.

          I was mostly arguing against the notion that things have gotten worse when the truth is that it’s just more visible. Same goes for stupid people and crazies.

        • @douglasg14b@lemmy.world
          link
          fedilink
          -22
          edit-2
          2 months ago

          This is not a healthy outlook on the world.

          Population generalization is extremely toxic. Yeah, lots are corrupt, but “Everyone that has job x” is patentably false, and is simply an emotional reaction and lashing out.

          It does nothing to solve any problems and just produces new ones. No progress is made that way, it’s the opposite of progress towards solving a problem. Are you here to just emotionally vent or are you here to actually hold a conversation?

          We don’t need more people acting like petulant adults who are entirely emotionally driven. We need more people who are willing to look at problems and figure out how we can organize to solve them.

          • @Garbanzo@lemmy.world
            link
            fedilink
            English
            212 months ago

            Population generalization is generally wrong, but we’re not talking about inherent personal traits here. Anyone who chooses to become a cop is suspect to begin with, and they’ll find they aren’t a cop for very long if they don’t back the bastards. Do a google search for police whistleblower retaliation if you need an infinite source of examples.

          • @Viking_Hippie@lemmy.world
            link
            fedilink
            142 months ago

            Would you agree that all fascists are bastards? What about the fascist-adjacent collaborators who do nothing to stop the fascists, sometimes even actively defending them? Do you agree that they’re all bastards?

            For most professions, you’d have a point, but just like fascists aren’t like most politicians, cops aren’t like most professions.

  • @masterspace@lemmy.ca
    link
    fedilink
    English
    -8
    edit-2
    2 months ago

    From watching the video, it’s honestly hard to say whether this is extrajudicial punishment or just gross incompetence and negligence.

    The first thing that’s immediately clear is that departmental negligence is involved at minimum. It really seems like police vehicles should have the ability to have seatbelts in them, and if there’s reasons they can’t (say anti-suicide or something), then they should not be allowed to drive more than like 20mph with someone in them unrestrained without a medical emergency.

    But whether it’s intentional assault or not is not clear to me. It absolutely could be an intentional rough ride, they didn’t turn the camera on for the majority of the ride, but that does beg the question of why they would turn the camera on when they heard a loud crash in the back and incriminate themselves rather than just leave it off. Even the victim’s lawsuit doesn’t quite allege that they were intentionally driving to hurt, so much that they were incredibly negligent:

    Thacker drove “in a reckless manner and at an unsafe rate of speed,” before he suddenly came to a hard stop at an alleged red light, the suit states

    It honestly seems like this could be a case of criminal negligence on the cops for driving too fast and then having to stop quickly as often happens when you’re driving too fast (as opposed to attempted murder / assault).

    And then given that cops presumably have first responder training, it also seems like criminal negligence the way the cop handled the guy who clearly had a likely spinal injury.

    I doubt anywhere close to appropriate charges or accountability will come from this since they’re cops, but at first blush this doesn’t seem like an intentional rough ride to me the way that Freddie Gray was.

    • @BreakDecks@lemmy.ml
      link
      fedilink
      English
      122 months ago

      Falsely arrested, maliciously prosecuted, and taken on a rough ride where he received permanent life-altering injuries.

      I’m done giving cops the benefit of a doubt on this shit. I cannot see this incident under these circumstances to be accidental.